Mortgage Rate Quote

This list is not inclusive of all states where Bond Street Mortgage, LLC may lend. Bond Street Mortgage, LLC is required to make the following disclosures by its regulatory authorities located in the applicable states. Not all states require such disclosures.
Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act
Delaware Chapter 24, Title 5 Licensed Lender
Licensed by the N.J. Department of Banking and Insurance.
Licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Insurance
Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Banking Department, Loans Arranged with 3rd Party Lenders
Licensed by Connecticut Department of Banking
Licensed by Texas Department of Savings and Mortgage Lending
Licensed Mortgage Lender by Florida Office of Financial Regulation
Company NMLS #: 191351

Bond Street Mortgage

Mortgage Rates Newsletter - Market Analysis


Mortgage rates have seen a fair amount of volatility so far this week, dropping quickly on Tuesday and moving in the opposite direction since then. Between yesterday and today, that big drop from earlier in the week has been completely erased. The result is an average conventional 30yr fixed rate that's right in line with those seen on Monday. Unfortunately, that also means today's rates are in line with their highest levels of the past 3 weeks. You'd have to go back to November 14th to see anything higher. The broader, relative range continues to offer good perspective . The average lender is still easily under 4% for top tier 30yr fixed scenarios. Perhaps even more reassuring is the fact that the gap between the highs and lows over this 3 week period is an eighth of a percentage point at
Mortgage rates dropped sharply yesterday after having risen to the highest levels in 2 weeks the day before. Yesterday's culprit was trade war related, but today had a more robust calendar of potentially market moving data. So did the data end up moving the market? If the title didn't give it away, let's make it clear: no! This market is at the whim of trade-related headlines first and foremost. In today's example a news story simply pushed back on the conclusions implied by yesterday's trade-related headlines. Specifically, yesterday's news left markets with the impression that a US/China trade deal could be delayed for more than a year while today's headlines said 'nah, it's not that bad, and in fact, it's actually pretty good.' With that, the underlying bond market lost ground, thus pushing
Mortgage rates were up to the highest levels in 2 weeks yesterday, but that was then and this is now. In the wee hours of the morning, trade-related headlines rocked financial markets. This sent stock prices and bond yields (aka "rates") lower at a rapid pace. Mortgage lenders began the day in much better territory. By the middle of the day, they'd seen enough improvement to reissue rate sheets with even better terms. The average lender is now close to the lowest rates since October 9th. Interest rates are in an interesting spot right now. They're willing (and compelled) to pay attention to headlines like those seen today, as well as the economic data that typically provides guidance. The data adheres to a schedule whereas the headlines usually don't. With that in mind, there's no way to say
Mortgage rates increased moderately to begin the new week/month and had been increasing in general during the previous week. The net effect is some lenders are quoting rates that are an eighth of a point higher compared to those seen at the beginning of last week, and an average rate quote that's as high as it's been in just over 2 weeks. In the bigger picture, this amount of movement is fairly tame. The average top tier rate offering is still easily under 4.0% and recent volatility is not nearly as big as that seen in September. All that to say, today in and of itself is no major cause for concern. It's the coming weeks and months that we should worry about. If economic data continues to improve and if the US and China can agree to a phase 1 trade deal, a "rising rate environment" would become
Mortgage rates recovered today after moving higher for the first time in nearly 2 weeks yesterday. In the bigger picture, rates have been in a back-and-forth pattern near long-term lows. Most of October and early November were spent with rates moving higher in that pattern after late September marked a surge lower. While we wouldn't call the past few weeks a "surge" per se, they've at least been moving in the right direction. The average lender improved back to levels seen about a week ago. Those were the best offerings in roughly 3 weeks. That said, we're only talking about small moves in the grand scheme of things. Most prospective borrowers will only be seeing slightly lower upfront costs on any given loan quote, if not a complete absence of change. Loan Originator Perspective Not so sure

Areas We Cover